Silver, gold, old toys, sports memorabilia: Association in Layton ready to buy

May 17 2012 - 12:11am

Images

NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Gloria and Ben Standing sell some coins to Doug Nyholm  on Wednesday at Fairfield Inn in Layton.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Colt Reber inspects a pile of utensils to see which are made of silver on Wednesday at Fairfield Inn in Layton.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
George Keyworth takes a closer look at a penny Wednesday at Fairfield Inn in Layton, after learning it was altered. Keyworth thought the penny may have been rare.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
The date on a penny is magnified Wednesday at Fairfield Inn in Layton to show that it has been altered. Had the penny been a 1943 copper version, it would have had substantial value.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Gloria and Ben Standing sell some coins to Doug Nyholm  on Wednesday at Fairfield Inn in Layton.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Colt Reber inspects a pile of utensils to see which are made of silver on Wednesday at Fairfield Inn in Layton.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
George Keyworth takes a closer look at a penny Wednesday at Fairfield Inn in Layton, after learning it was altered. Keyworth thought the penny may have been rare.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
The date on a penny is magnified Wednesday at Fairfield Inn in Layton to show that it has been altered. Had the penny been a 1943 copper version, it would have had substantial value.

LAYTON -- Ben and Gloria Standing, of Roy, had accumulated several miscellaneous old silver coins over the years. On Wednesday the couple was looking to trade them in.

The buyers, looking for old gold and silver coins, or toys and sports memorabilia pre-dating the 1960s, are part of the International Coin Collectors Association of Springfield, Ill.

The association has set up a temporary office in the main floor conference room of the Fairfield Inn in Layton. The collectors will be available through Saturday.

Gloria Standing said she and her husband -- after some spring cleaning -- brought the coins in for trade because neither of them are coin collectors.

"You never know," Gloria said of what the value of the coins might be.

Before the Standings were done visiting with professional numismatist Doug A. Nyholm, they had received $58 from the association for a portion of the coins they had brought in.

The Standings also had other coins, including a memorabilia set bearing the faces of the nation's presidents, which the couple couldn't part with.

Clearfield resident Joanne Higdon received much more for her time. The woman who had brought in several short stacks of 1-ounce pieces of silver, walked away with a check for $1,024.

"These are great people," Higdon said of the buyers.

She said she is going to use the money to buy a scooter to help her and her husband get around.

Nyholm, a self-described "coiniac," said he takes pleasure in making people happy.

"Most of what comes in (for trade) is precious metals," Nyholm said.

"There are a lot of people out there that have un-found treasure in their homes," said Nyholm, who has written three books about currency.

On occasion, Nyholm said, they do come across counterfeit coins. But generally traders come to cash in coins or other collectibles because they are accumulating around their home and they want to get rid of them, he said, or because times are tough and they need money for their collectibles. One of the more popular items brought in for trade is silver flatware, he said.

Other items the collector's group is looking to buy are baseball cards from before 1960; sports autographs that can be authenticated; Tonka toys, and original G.I. Joe or Barbie dolls.

Buyers will be available from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. today and Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.

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