Wildcats majoring in education learn by teaching at Kitty College

Dec 29 2011 - 12:49am

Images

Talia Miller (left) and Amanda George laugh as students play a game during Kitty College at Weber State University in Ogden on Wednesday. (NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner)
Kennedy Conley (center) listens as Libbey Tippetts answers a question during Kitty College at Weber State University in Ogden on Wednesday. (NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner)
Carter Rose watches as a WSU education student writes on the board during Kitty College at Weber State University in Ogden on Wednesday.  (NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner)
During Kitty College at Weber State University in Ogden on Wednesday, Laura Kiester (center) tries to guess who is seated behind her based on a description of their clothing. (NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner)
Talia Miller (left) and Amanda George laugh as students play a game during Kitty College at Weber State University in Ogden on Wednesday. (NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner)
Kennedy Conley (center) listens as Libbey Tippetts answers a question during Kitty College at Weber State University in Ogden on Wednesday. (NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner)
Carter Rose watches as a WSU education student writes on the board during Kitty College at Weber State University in Ogden on Wednesday.  (NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner)
During Kitty College at Weber State University in Ogden on Wednesday, Laura Kiester (center) tries to guess who is seated behind her based on a description of their clothing. (NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner)

OGDEN -- Kwanzaa and New Year's Eve celebrations and resolutions are all things to think about the week after Christmas, but now younger minds are thinking about those things, too, thanks to Weber State University's College of Education Kitty College for elementary school-aged kids this week.

Students have spent the week learning about New Year's events through art projects, dancing and writing.

The Future Educators Association sponsored the event.

Students were placed into two groups according to age and put with several college student volunteers striving to be teachers themselves.

The college students held the event to raise funds for an international future educators' conference to be held in February.

A Kitty College in the summer was a great success, so the FEA club decided to give it another try during Christmas break, said Stephanie Heath, FEA adviser and recruitment director for the college of education.

About 70 youngsters signed up for the $30 camp, which has run for three days.

"We didn't know what to expect with so many people that go out of town and have other plans, but it has been very successful," Heath said as she looked into a room full of youngsters busy coloring pictures and chatting with their teachers.

She also was impressed with how much the students enjoyed learning about things that happen at the start of a year.

"They have been really excited to get their minds working," Heath said.

Kelsie Klein, 6, madly colored a picture of herself with her cousins and said her New Year's "revolution" was to share with her cousins better.

She also planned to draw a picture of herself working harder in school.

"I like it," she said. "I like drawing and all the craft parts."

Britain Zisumbo, a WSU sophomore who plans to be a teacher, said she enjoyed her time with the young students this week.

She also likes the fact that she and her fellow college students got to plan all the activities and work directly with the youngsters, she said.

"There is a lot more prep work, and it's hard to come up with schedules every day, but it has been good," she said.

She has enjoyed the positive feedback she has received from parents and children as they come and leave each day, Zisumbo said.

"They were so excited," said Jessica Hunter, another WSU student volunteer at the camp.

Heath plans to continue the Kitty College program in the summer and hopes many will see the impact it has on the students.

Ruby Thatcher is an administrative assistant in the education dean's office and sees the Kitty College having far-reaching effects.

"It's never too early to start young ones to prepare to go to a big college," she said. "I love Weber, and I want these kids to come here."

She also sees a difference with the college students who are getting the hands-on training with the youngsters and said it is opening doors for them.

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